Analysis by NASA and the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association) confirming 2014 was the world’s hottest year on record highlights the urgent need for serious action to tackle global warming, said the Australian Conservation Foundation.

“Two of the world’s most respected scientific bodies have confirmed 2014 was the world’s hottest year and nine of the ten hottest years ever recorded have occurred this century,” said ACF’s climate change program manager Victoria McKenzie-McHarg.

“February 1985 was the last month that was cooler than the 20th century monthly average – so there have been 358 consecutive months that were warmer than the long term average.

“In other words, if you are under 30 years old, you’ve never lived through a month that was cooler than the long term average,” she said.

The international results come a week after the Bureau of Meteorology confirmed Australia had just experienced its third hottest year and hottest decade on record.

“Australians were right on the front line of climate change in 2014, experiencing deadly heatwaves, bushfires and other extreme weather.

“The World Meteorological Organisation said last month a window is still open for the world to prevent dangerous climate change, but only if we take serious action now.

“Unfortunately the Abbott Government seems more interested in protecting the profits of big polluters than protecting Australia for future generations.

“The Government has scrapped Australia’s pollution-cutting carbon price, allowing polluting companies to pollute for free, and is undermining the Renewable Energy Target.

“This year shapes as a critical year for action on climate change with the NASA/NOAA analysis providing more evidence that governments around the world – including in Australia – need to start representing their communities, not the big polluters.”

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Journalists with enquiries may contact Tom Arup on 0402 482 910 or Josh Meadows on 0439 342 992. For all other enquiries please call 1800 223 669 or email action@acf.org.au.